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Small businesses in Calgary are struggling to survive the coronavirus pandemic – Calgary

The COVID-19 crisis has dealt a severe blow to many small businesses in Calgary, many of whom are in a desperate battle for survival.

“March [was] A disaster that has seen business fall 75 percent, “said Minin Bhatt, owner of Tiffin Curry and Roti House, on Thursday.

“Slowly, one by one, we had to lay off our employees – all of them.”

After the restaurant was closed for nine days, it reopened and is responding to calls from customers wanting to buy meals.

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In accordance with a provincial-ordered restaurant closure, Tiffin dines on supplies and other ways to serve people.

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“I have a few customers who don’t want to get out of the car,” said Bhatt. “So let’s just make a box for you, just load it [it] in the trunk and they give us a card and we type for them. “

The pandemic has also made big changes in Bridgeland Market, a grocery and deli.

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“Mostly it’s a roadside pickup,” said shop owner Yousef Traya. “You can call and collect your order and you just honk and we will bring it to your car.”

The store, which has existed since 1981, has also introduced a new delivery service.

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“It’s a necessity for people who are in quarantine or who don’t want to go [their homes]”Traya said.” It’s quite a challenge, but we all have to get involved. “

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The coronavirus crisis also posed major challenges for the family-run Pisces Pet Emporium, which had to lay off several employees.

“We closed our doors to reduce foot traffic in the store,” said Kelsey Watkiss, general manager. “We introduced the curb there [pickup]… We also ship and deliver via our online webshop. “

She said the store provides an important service for people in self-isolation who continue to need proper care for their pets.

“These animals have yet to eat, these animals have yet to chew on things,” said Watkiss. “Many animals have special diets – you can’t get that in the supermarket.”

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She said the pandemic had brought new business to her business as well.

“People are even building new ones [fish] Tanks while they are sitting at home with nothing better to do, so we helped them with that, too, ”said Watkiss. “We fly past the seat of our pants and evolve and change every day.”

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Constant change is the only constant for many small businesses today as they take all possible steps to stay afloat.

“Every day is a new day – we don’t know what will happen tomorrow,” said Bhatt. “But it’s okay, we’re all together and sailing in the same boat.”

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